Today in Food History – April 2nd

I have been waiting all year for this one! YUM :-)

APRIL 2 – Today in Food History
- National Peanut Butter and Jelly Day

 
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April 2nd marks National Peanut Butter and Jelly Day, a holiday dedicated to the classic childhood favorite.

Legend has it that American soldiers in World War II mixed their rations of peanut butter and jelly to make a new treat. When they returned home, sales of peanut butter and jelly soared. Everyone was soon making PB& J sandwiches.

This creative combination is frequently credited with turning the sandwich into a common meal/snack of postwar America.

Rich, creamy (or chunky peanut butter) paired together with gooey jelly makes a traditional PB & J delight. Although many people often use grape jelly, personally I prefer strawberry or raspberry jelly or jam. However, please note: I will not pass up grape jelly combinations.

According to the National Peanut Board, the average child will consume 1,500 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches by the time he/she graduates from high school.

Other popular peanut butter sandwich combinations include banana, cream cheese, honey, and marshmallows or marshmallow fluff.

Find a recipe for Peanut Butter Bread under Kitchen Love Page

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© by rgb for “On Dragonfly Wings with Buttercup Tea”, 2011

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About becca givens

Becca is an artist, poet, and animal communicator. She delights in cooking, nurturing, and sharing a rich spiritual life with others on the Path.
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6 Responses to Today in Food History – April 2nd

  1. jennirey says:

    Becca,
    Thanks for your food history, and I just love your pictures.

  2. Pam says:

    Rebecca, Thank you for this interesting and fun blog Food History. Not to mention yummy! Pam

  3. trisha says:

    hope you relished it to the core. :)

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