Nurturing Hope through Drought


Looking out my window
Grass crying for rain
Flowers disappearing in heat
Trees standing majestically near

Oaks patiently await watering
Shading whatever comes close
Nurturing hope drought is
Approaching its end soon


Our area in Central Texas, USA has officially set the record for consecutive 100-degree days, the National Weather Service reported this afternoon. Today makes 43 straight days of triple-digit temperatures, breaking the record of 42 set in 1980.

We are in “severe drought conditions” and recently moved to Level 2 for watering gardens. Our official days, based on our address, are Mondays and Thursdays.ย  At this point, I am only interested in saving special roses, day lilies and enough water to sustain our 150+ yr old majestic oaks.

______________________________________________
Image Credit

ยฉ rgb for “On Dragonfly Wings with Buttercup Tea”, 2011

Prompt:
Tree

About becca givens

Becca is an artist, poet, and animal communicator. She delights in cooking, nurturing, and sharing a rich spiritual life with others on the Path.
This entry was posted in 4 x 4 poetry and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

19 Responses to Nurturing Hope through Drought

  1. anjoe says:

    Here on my island, Lolland, south of Denmark, we have lots of problems this summer. Lots and lots of rain, day in and day out, why many farmers have big problems ๐Ÿ˜ฆ Too are a lot of roads totally full of water, houses the same, so many would surely send your area rainwater ๐Ÿ™‚ My oldest brother and his family lives in San Antonio, Texas, but just how it is there now, I don’t know – havent had contact the last weeks!
    May you soon get some rain, that I truely wish ๐Ÿ˜€

    Like

    • becca givens says:

      Anjoe – thank you for stopping by for a visit and leaving a comment. I believe San Antonio may have had some rain last week when a tropical depression arrived in the Gulf of Mexico … but not in the amount South TX was hoping for. The area north of us received some rain over the weekend, but it did not make it to us. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ We continue to pray and wait. I also feel for the areas that get an overabundance of rain. It just is another cycle with Mother Nature – balance is ideal.

      Like

  2. S Basu says:

    that must be horrible! we here were having more than required pouring down, which met dep says is over for this round.

    Like

  3. Renee Espriu says:

    Heard on the news that the triple digit temperatures finally broke after 40 days. I don’t know if I could endure as you have. You are in my prayers always.

    Like

    • becca givens says:

      It broke in the Dallas-Fort Worth area – but not for us … we hit 103 … with heat index near 106! We are about 1 1/2 – 2 hours south of DFW … Thank you for the prayers — much appreciated!

      Like

  4. Pat Cegan says:

    We, too, are in our “dry” season…five to six months of no rain. We water daily, sometimes twice a day. There is a pond uphill from me so am lucky to have gravational fed hoses connecting the pond to the gardens. Lots of work to lug the water every day but an act of love. Lovely poem, as always, Becca. hugs, pat

    Like

  5. Mike Patrick says:

    Perhaps the oaks’ roots are deep enough to reach the water table. Your drought is probably not new to them, I would worry more about your flowering plants, but if it continues long enough, even they can parish. It is the beginning of the hurricane season. From your location, you should be far enough inland to only receive rain if one should come ashore. I canโ€™t bring myself to pray for a hurricane, but . . . .

    Like

    • becca givens says:

      I pray for this, Mike … most of the flowers are gone – just trying to keep the day lilies alive (they were dug up by my dad from his garden) as well as my “Katrina” roses (they survived the Katrina flooding – let’s hope they survive the drought as well) … since I am from South Louisiana I absolutely cannot bring myself to pray for a hurricane, but if a tropical depression arrives, hits in the middle of nowhere and supplies rain – then I would be a happy camper!!! Thank you for stopping by for a visit.

      Like

  6. What a wonderful sky. I hope you join us next tuesday on *PicStory* where the topic is: *Sky*. You are warmly invited to do so! LG Tina

    Like

  7. Nanka says:

    Thank you Becca for giving us an insight into your part of the world. Difficult times with soaring temperatures and curtailed water for plants.We here are in the middle of monsoon with pouring rain and flooding!! Hope the inconveniences and difficulties that you are encountering end soon!!

    Like

    • becca givens says:

      Monsoons on the opposite end of the spectrum present their challenges with nature and humans as well … wish we could meet in the middle and share some of each to balance! ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

  8. souldipper says:

    This gives me heart ache, Becca. Your sweet poem really bring this home. The connectivity of all living things is profoundly at play and I send prayers of hope that everything is soon watered.

    Like

  9. siggiofmaine says:

    Thank you for your lovely post to the tree…and other plants in your garden.
    How difficult it must be to know there is not a thing you can do for them.

    Thank you also for the explanation of the watering restrictions…
    I hope your plants and the precious elderly tree survive.

    โ˜ฎ โ™ฅ. Siggi in Downeast Maine
    http://www.siggiofmaine.wordpress.com

    Like

  10. You’re nurturing hope
    with all your poetry prayers
    raining loveliness

    Like

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